Titche-Goettinger Co., Dallas




Advertising Image of the Titche-Goettinger Store
Titche's downtown Dallas store showing
the "Texas-Size" 1955 addition
 






Titche-Goettinger Co. (1902)
1901 Elm Street
Dallas, Texas


RI 8-8581




Basement
Texas Buffet • Titche’s Budget Floor

Main Floor
Fine Jewelry • Costume Jewelry • Precious Metals • Cosmetics • Drugs
  Fashion Accessories • Main Floor Lingerie • Main Floor Sportswear • Gloves • Handbags • Small Leather Goods • Hosiery • Scarfs • Stationery • Candy • Men's Furnishings  Men's Sporstwear  Men's Shoes  Men's Hats  Men's Clothing • University Shop


Elm Street Annex
Cameras • Sporting Goods

Mezzanine
Book Shop • Bake Shop • The Coffee Shop • Records

Second Floor
Sportswear • Coats • Suits • Fashion II Dresses • Miss Titche Sportswear • Miss Titche Dresses • Miss Titche Casual Dresses • The Women’s Shop • Blouse Bar • Swim Shop • Boutique • Pin Money Shop • Town and Career Shop • Bridal Salon • Fur Salon • Millinery • Wig Shop • Boutique Shop • Bazaar • Social Occasion Shop • Pacesetter Shop • Forecast Shop • Focus Dresses • Focus Sportswear • The Dallas Room • Junior Dress Shop • Junior Sportswear • Junior Coats • Tempo Shop for Juniors • The Tea Room

Third Floor
Children’s World Girl’s Shop • Shindig • Boys’ Wear • Young Mr. 1 • Infants • Toddlers • Children’s Shoes • Children’s Accessories • Girl’s Lingerie
Photo Studio • Longerie • Robes • Foundations • Sleepwear • Uniforms
  Maternity Shop • Shoe Salon • Casual Shoe Bar • Town and Country Shoe Shop • Shoe Bazaar • Young Modern Shoe Shop • Joyce Patio Shoes

Fourth Floor
Gift Shop • China • Silver • Glassware • Linens • Decorative Accessories • Lamps • Pictures • Mirrors • Draperies • Curtains • Custom Shop • Beauty Salon

Fifth Floor
Carpets • Rugs • Oriental Rugs • Furniture • Lifestyle Furniture • Bedding  •  Interior Decorating Studio

Sixth Floor
Housewares • Cookware Corner • Toys • Appliances • Television • Stereos • Customer Service
 • Personnel Office 

Seventh Floor
Auditorium

Executive Offices  •  Advertising  •  Ann Thomas, Personal Shopper  •  Credit Union

(456,000 sq. ft.)






Preston Forest Village
1961
117,000 sq. ft.

Wynnewood Village (1961)
86,000 sq. ft.


Lochwood
1961
89,000 sq. ft.

Arlington 
Park Plaza Shopping Center
1961
89,000 sq. ft.
NorthPark Center
July, 1965
200,000 sq. ft.
Granada Restaurant
North East Mall (1971)
Hurst
160,000 sq. ft.

Town East Mall (1971)
Mesquite
160,000 sq. ft.

Irving Mall
February, 1971
160,000 sq. ft.
Jetport Grill
Coffee Shop

Red Bird Mall
1975
100,000 sq. ft.

Richardson Square 
 1977
143,000 sq. ft.




Coming in due course.











23 comments:

  1. Titche Goettinger also operated a suburban store in the Park Plaza Center in Arlington, Texas. This store was built in 1958 by The Fair of Texas, a high end chain of five stores in the Fort worth area. In 1963, the stores were sold, with only the Arlington store going to Titche's. It operated as Titche's until the early 1970's when all Titche's stores were diverted to the name of their sister store in the Allied Group, Joske.'s of San Antonio.The store was about 89,000 square feet, and it operated as Joskes until Dillards purchased the Joske stores in the late 1970's, and the Arlington Joskes store was closed. it is now a discount grocery store.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Titche's was late in expanding to the suburbs. Their competition, Sanger Bros., already had several suburban stores by 1960. The Titche's stores at Preston Forest, Wynnewood, and Lochwood were built for The Fair, but were purchased by Titche's in an effort to quickly expand to the suburbs. I don't think The Fair ever occupied them.

    Titche's was founded in 1902 and was originally a "carriage trade" store. The downtown store pictured above was completed in 1929. Ownership changed around the time of the Depression and it became a more middle-class store thereafter. I still have my Titche's credit card from the '70s!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Re: Titche's Photo Studio. Whatever happened to or who might have acquired the photo/proof/negative inventory of the downtown Dallas, TX, store? I am trying to track down photos taken in the late 50's and early 60's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be interesting to see where all of the store files/photos ended up. There are some on display inside the building in downtown Dallas, along with original advertisements and the record books. But the only photos from the 50s & 60s are ones in various publications.

      Delete
  4. There was another Titche's store downtown as well, in One Maine Place. I think Wynnewood closed when the Red Bird Mall store opened. The Red Bird Titche's, like the Sanger-Harris store at Red Bird were #1 in sales per square foot for both chains. They were not large stores but performed exceptionally well. The Sanger-Harris store at redbird now operates as a Macy's although the Macy's store at Red Bird Mall continues to do very well the mall is more or less dead. the Preston Forest store was there until Dillard's took over. The downtown store was a beauty and well merchandised until Dillard's closed it.

    There were several other department stores based in Dallas including:

    Volk, Dreyfus Brothers, EM Kahn, Roberts and Levine's

    Volk was an amazing store with a beautiful building downtown

    ReplyDelete
  5. Here's a peek into the Titche-Goettinger Building in Dallas, which today houses university classrooms and apartments: http://www.harwoodhistoricdistrict.com/2012/01/exploring-the-texas-sized-titche-goettinger-building/

    ReplyDelete
  6. I would absolutely love to know if anyone has any photos or can tell me where I can find copies of the window signs that were painted between about 1935 and 1968. My great-grandfather did ALL the art for the Titche's stores and I would treasure that.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I recently found a hatbox from Titche-Goettinger Co. at an estate sale. It has the original sales ticket inside. Although it does not have the year on the ticket, I am assuming it's from the 40's. The box is very plain and drab -- may have been a men's hatbox? The ticket shows the imprint from the old "charge a plate" that was popular in Dallas and could be used in many of the major stores. My mother used to have one and we kept it for many years. Not sure where that is now.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Steve Schaffer30 March, 2012 05:14

    Will L: yes, The Fair of Texas did occupy the Lochwood store, for at least a while before Titche's bought it and changed the name - very modern interior for the times.

    ReplyDelete
  9. i recentaly had a older family member pass away and we foung a mink cocktail coat and a hat with a veil on it. Both being from Titche-Goettinger. Just trying to fins some information on these items and where they should go. Can you help?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Please keep posting information about this store. I would like to know more about it.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Titche's was originally located in the Wilson Bulding at Main & Ervay Streets. The store moved to the building depicted above at Main & St. Paul Streets in 1929. In 1955 a large annex was built onto the east side of the 1929 building.

    ReplyDelete
  12. About 10 years ago i purchased am old antique looking mink jacket from a ventage shop in Plano TX. Stored in my attic all this time and here it is 2013 im learning more on the old Dallas based store (Titches- Dallas) now well known as Dillards. this jacket still carries its original label in it also; stiched in its side the name Geneva Hardgrove and a date of 10/ 20/67. anyone outthere with a clue?

    ReplyDelete
  13. My mom and sister used to take me to Titches in north park and Lochwood. I loved it so much. I always loved her copper charge a plate.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Here is a tale that you won't hear from many folks :)

    50 years ago (Summer of 1963) My family moved from Boston to Dallas, my Father being transferred from Allied Stores, Jordan Marsh to Titches in Dallas.

    I don't remember the move but I was there 50 years ago....

    November 22, 1963...

    I remember that I wanted to stay home from school that day, because I knew Dad would be able to see President Kennedy.

    However, I went to school and remember my 1st grade teacher, Miss Walker telling us that either the President had been shot or was dead.

    Coming home from school, I lived just across the street, Mom was crying.

    Mom told me in later years that we even went to church to pray...we are Catholic and I remember not being too happy ...couldn't watch anything else on tv because it was just the coverage...

    Coming home Dad had told us that he saw President Kennedy just minutes before he was shot.

    Dad was still at the store, the only democrat out of all the executives who were at the Dallas Trade Mart waiting to hear the President..

    Among them was The President of Titches, Mr Lee Starr, who had roomed with JFK at Harvard for one semester.

    He never saw him again.

    9 years later, we found out that by marriage we are distant cousins to JFK....

    ReplyDelete
  15. Truly, a fascinating story . . . I have memories of the same day in Detroit - playing in our (semi-finished) basement at age 5, and seeing my mother come down the stairs crying, and saying "someone got a bullet and shot President Kennedy!"

    ReplyDelete
  16. I have a Titche's cream Mink coat from around the 1940's I am trying to get in touch with the Museum does anyone know the phone number please???? many thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  17. It was the summer of 1965, the summer after my freshman year in college. I returned home to get a summer job to make some spending money, and maybe some money to begin school again come September. Summer jobs had been tough to find early in the summer. Then, word got out that a strike had been called against the huge construction project near Northwest Highway and North Central Expressway. The strike was threatening to delay the scheduled opening of a new shopping center called NorthPark. Rumor had it that college kids were being hired to complete this mammoth project. I thought this meant construction work to finish building the buildings which paid well in those days.

    I went down to the construction shack and filled out an application. A few days later I received a call to come to work the next morning. The job, as it turned out, was not construction but to set up and stock the point-of-sale stations throughout the Titche-Goettinger store at NorthPark Center. Titche’s parent company, Allied Stores Inc., sent their company vice presidents to Texas to ensure the timely opening of their new store. These vice presidents must have been under enormous pressure to get the store in position to open as scheduled.

    Our job was to find each point-of-sale station, which was not easy due to the unfinished construction, and then to stock it exactly like every other station with a credit card imprinter, a stapler and the various sizes of embossed paper bags. We had a crew of six or eight college kids led by a store vice president from New York. It was the first time most of us had met, let alone worked with, a New York businessman. He was as skeptical of us as we were of him.

    Our supplies were so voluminous that they took up the entire area between the inner and outer doors of the south entrance (nearest Northwest Highway) to the store. Each morning we would begin work by stocking our carts with the supplies that were to be left at the various point-of-sale counters. We worked hard for two or three weeks getting the stations set-up for the opening, and actually finished sooner than projected, making our VP a hero. Before he returned to New York, we took him for Texas-style barbeque. He promised those of us who began and finished the project that he would place a note in our personnel files that we could always work for Allied Stores.

    The sales floors were busy with different work crews setting up and later stocking the store fixtures. It seemed a busy place, but it was quiet as a tomb compared to what was to come. The mall’s grand opening can best be described as humanity unleashed. I had found a strategic location, and when the huge doors to the mall opened, there was truly a human flood. I had never seen so many people.

    After the VP departed, we became stock boys with khaki uniforms that had our names stenciled on them. As merchandise was received, we would route it to the appropriate department, then help the department manager put the merchandise on display for sale. This involved uncrating and setting up the displays for various kinds of merchandise, which led to the creation of a bulk wrap station for mailing or shipping merchandise to customers, as well as receiving and processing returns.

    That summer I was given the opportunity to work in several departments and to learn about retail store operations. When I returned to school, I thought no more about my work as a stock boy. The following December, I needed some Christmas money, so I thought I would test out what that VP had promised about always being able to work there. Sure enough they put me to work right away. I worked that Christmas season, the following summer and subsequent Christmas seasons.

    Titche-Goettinger ultimately became Dillard’s Department Store, but I will always be grateful for the lessons learned, the people I met, and the honor of a man that kept his commitment to a bunch of college kids.

    ReplyDelete
  18. It was the summer of 1965, the summer after my freshman year in college. I returned home to get a summer job to make some spending money, and maybe some money to begin school again come September. Summer jobs had been tough to find early in the summer. Then, word got out that a strike had been called against the huge construction project near Northwest Highway and North Central Expressway. The strike was threatening to delay the scheduled opening of a new shopping center called NorthPark. Rumor had it that college kids were being hired to complete this mammoth project. I thought this meant construction work to finish building the buildings which paid well in those days.

    I went down to the construction shack and filled out an application. A few days later I received a call to come to work the next morning. The job, as it turned out, was not construction but to set up and stock the point-of-sale stations throughout the Titche-Goettinger store at NorthPark Center. Titche’s parent company, Allied Stores Inc., sent their company vice presidents to Texas to ensure the timely opening of their new store. These vice presidents must have been under enormous pressure to get the store in position to open as scheduled.

    Our job was to find each point-of-sale station, which was not easy due to the unfinished construction, and then to stock it exactly like every other station with a credit card imprinter, a stapler and the various sizes of embossed paper bags. We had a crew of six or eight college kids led by a store vice president from New York. It was the first time most of us had met, let alone worked with, a New York businessman. He was as skeptical of us as we were of him.

    Our supplies were so voluminous that they took up the entire area between the inner and outer doors of the south entrance (nearest Northwest Highway) to the store. Each morning we would begin work by stocking our carts with the supplies that were to be left at the various point-of-sale counters. We worked hard for two or three weeks getting the stations set-up for the opening, and actually finished sooner than projected, making our VP a hero. Before he returned to New York, we took him for Texas-style barbeque. He promised those of us who began and finished the project that he would place a note in our personnel files that we could always work for Allied Stores.

    The sales floors were busy with different work crews setting up and later stocking the store fixtures. It seemed a busy place, but it was quiet as a tomb compared to what was to come. The mall’s grand opening can best be described as humanity unleashed. I had found a strategic location, and when the huge doors to the mall opened, there was truly a human flood. I had never seen so many people.

    After the VP departed, we became stock boys with khaki uniforms that had our names stenciled on them. As merchandise was received, we would route it to the appropriate department, then help the department manager put the merchandise on display for sale. This involved uncrating and setting up the displays for various kinds of merchandise, which led to the creation of a bulk wrap station for mailing or shipping merchandise to customers, as well as receiving and processing returns.

    That summer I was given the opportunity to work in several departments and to learn about retail store operations. When I returned to school, I thought no more about my work as a stock boy. The following December, I needed some Christmas money, so I thought I would test out what that VP had promised about always being able to work there. Sure enough they put me to work right away. I worked that Christmas season, the following summer and subsequent Christmas seasons.

    Titche-Goettinger ultimately became Dillard’s Department Store, but I will always be grateful for the lessons learned, the people I met, and the honor of a man that kept his commitment to a bunch of college kids.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I worked for Titches/Joskes for 12 years, 1971 through 1983. I started off in The Towneast store and Later Moved to the Northpark store. I have been lucky to have spent some time doing some work in Most those stores, Been in all the old Fair stores. The stock rooms of several Did have stamped Fair Brothers markings in the stock rooms. So It would appear they had at one time been opened as Fair stores. I Do not think there is a store in the Dallas Area I had not been in or did some kind of work in it. Would mention There was no mention of the Preston Wood mall store by any one I seen in this Article. It was a very Nice store. Could not believe that mall was closed. I had been all through the Down Town store it was very Nice with all the Antique decor. I have been to the San Antonio Down town Joskes that was by the river walk it was nice and a lot Like the Dallas Store. Titches/ Joskes was a great place to work, Great Benefits for its employees. Allied Corp was a great Place with many major Store chains belonging to the Allied Corp.

    ReplyDelete
  20. my first job was titche's town east as a "flyer". I worked any department they needed me in. the years were 1973-76, I remember the restaurant they had downstairs where once a year they would hold a fashion show. all of the departments personnel & family members would model the latest fashions. marina Oswald worked there at the time, I worked with her many a day. she was very sweet and very quite, a hard worker. her daughters were beautiful and walked in the fashion show also. after awhile I settled in the men's department, remember those quiana shirts, lol. disco danny's would flock to get those things and they were so hot to wear. although, they did look good on the right body, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  21. We moved to Dallas from Woodland Hills Ca in 1963, I was 5. Back then it was normal and safe to live in the city and of course the only place to shop in a Dept. store and most stores was downtown. Downtown Dallas was spectacular back then and crowded on the streets every weekend with all the shopper as if you were in NYC. At least it seemed that way to a little girl. My sister 10 years older than me loved to shop and Titches was her main store. My favorite memories were at Christmas with all the beautiful Christmas window displays and the indoor Christmas train and all the decorations. I guess you could say the movie "A Christmas Story" comes about as close as you can get when describing the inside of Titches at Christmas. Wow, I miss those days. Now its Malls that you have to be afraid of, and times have just changed everything in the way of shopping.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Where was the Lochwood location? New to Dallas and curious about this location.

    ReplyDelete

Comments