The Hecht Co., Washington D.C.


The Hecht Co.'s terra-cotta faced F Street store at the
corner of 7th Street NW in the Nation's capitol.

The new building of The Hecht Co. opened to
great fanfare on November 12, 1925


In 1941, the store was expanded to E Street by a
modernistic addition.

The various buildings of The Hecht Co. began
to fill an entire block and were advertised as the
"Greater Hecht Co. Store."


A 1957 view from 6th and F Streets, NW, shows
The Hecht Co.'s expanded store and adjoining
parking decks.


The Hecht Co.
F Street
Washington, D.C. (1896/1925)



NAtional 8-5100




 



Downstairs
Thrift Center

Street Level
Fine Jewelry • Watches • Diamonds • Clocks • Costume Jewelry • Real Thing Jewelry • Scarves • Umbrellas • Handbags • Small Leather Goods • Belts • Gloves • Hosiery • Sunglasses • Ladies’ Accessories • Cosmetics • Wig Salon • Boulevard Sportswear • Boulevard Sportswear “Directions” • Blouses • Sweaters • Boulevard Shoes • Calculator Boutique • Cameras • Stationery • Notions • Luggage • Candy • Gourmet Foods • Bakery • Live Shop Healthy Foods • Telephones • Calculator Boutique • Cameras • Fabrics • Art Needlework • Optical Dept. • Pet Shop • Fabrics • Men’s Furnishings • Men’s Sportswear • Men’s Accessories • Young Men’s Club • Books

Mezzanine
Boulevard Dresses • Boulevard Coats • Daytime Dresses

Second Floor
Men’s Clothing • Men’s Outerwear • Men’s Hats • Men’s Shoes • Men’s Sportswear • Tots’ & Toddlers’ Wear • Infants’ Wear • Infants’ Furniture • Girls’ Wear • Girls’ Sleepwear • Sub-Teen Wear • Boys’ Wear • Jr. Deb Wear • Children’s Shoes • Maternity

Third Floor

Miss Washingtonian Shop • Metropolitan Dresses • Forecast Shop • After Five Shop • The Scene • Embassy Room • Fine Line Boutique • Sports Apparel • Splashdown! • Casual Dressing • Town and Country Dresses • Town and Country Sportswear • The Updated Miss • Junior Dresses • Junior Sportswear • Junior Coats • Junior Shoes • The Knack • Rainwear • Town and Country Coats • Fur Salon • Bridal Shop • Bridal Bureau • Millinery Salon • Fashion Shoes • Lingerie • Bras and Body Fashions • Misses’ Loungewear • Misses’ Sleepwear • Toys • Official Scout Headquarters • Sporting Goods • Artist’s Center • Georgetown Restaurant • Gourmet Grill

Fourth Floor
Furniture • Bedding and Sleep Furniture • Orient Express Shop • Interior Design Studio

Fifth Floor
Stereos • Televisions • Radios • Televisions • Appliances • Domestics • Blankets • Pillows • Linens • Bath Shop

Sixth Floor
Bedspreads • Curtains • Draperies • Slipcovers • Decorative Pillows • Pictures and Mirrors • Rugs and Broadloom • Slipcovers

Seventh Floor
Housewares • Electrical Appliances • China • Glassware • Gifts • Silver Shop • Lamps and Shades • Dinettes • The Loft • Hardware • Garden Shop • Vacuums • Cleaning Supplies


(555,000 sq. ft.)






Silver Spring (1947)
255,000 sq. ft.
The Maryland Room


Parkington (1951)
285,000 sq. ft.
The Virginia Room





Prince Georges Plaza (1958)
Hyattsville, MD
198,000 sq. ft.
The Maryland Room

Marlow Heights (1960)
196,000 sq. ft.
The Maryland Room



Laurel Shopping CenterBaltimore Ave & Montrose St.
Laurel, MD
84,000 sq. ft.
The Snack Bar


Landmark Center (1965)
162,000 sq. ft.

Montgomery Mall (1968)
Bethesda, MD
217,000 sq. ft.
The Garden Spot
  
Tysons Corner Center (1968)
McLean, VA
234,000 sq. ft.
The Garden Spot
Landover Mall (1972)
155,000 sq. ft.
The Castle Keep


Lakeforest Mall (1978)
Gaithersburg, MD
150,000 sq. ft.





Coming in Due Course.








30 comments:

  1. I'm sorry to bother you! If any of you know of a lady who used to work at the Hecht Museum in D.C. in the late '60's & '70's, please give her my email so she can contact me.

    Her name is Helen Drivas and she was responsible for taking my grandfather on a tour there (after his exhibit at Macy's) where another exhibit was arrange at the D.C. location!

    Thanks,
    Chrysoula
    kryskreations@yahoo.com

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  2. My first job was at the Hecht Company at 7th and F Sts. N.W. at the age of 16. My paycheck for the week was about $38.00 if my memory serves me correctly. The year was 1958. I stood behind the counter on the first floor selling ladies gloves at Christmas time. Across the street on F was the White Tower where we would go to share a cherry coke a hamburger and play the jukebox at lunch. I remember the elevator operators wearing uniforms. The biggest perk of all was to see the magical window displays for Xmas at Hechts, Woodies, Lansburghs and Kanns Department Stores. Neisners was another wonderful place to go for teens. We could sit and listen to 45 rpm rock and roll hits for free. Hop on a street car to get home. Nobody had a car back then, and nobody cared. We were having too much fun.

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  3. Dear Sharon:

    You, like many others, have related a great tale of how these stores formed a background to our lives at the time . . . an aspect of life I find missing in our throw-away, cookie-cutter society. It wasn't just stores, I believe - there are many other things (neighborhoods, hotels, modes of transport, amusement parks) that managed to add richness to life, so that people actually enjoyed mundane things things like shopping.

    My favorite part of your comment is that you were having "too much fun" to care about a car, since downtown shopping, taking the streetcar, etc. made life itself fun. I think we could all use a little less hassle and more sheer enjoyment out of the simple things in life. Enough philosophizing, though, for me.

    I visited Woodward & Lothrop, The Hecht Co., and Garfinckel's in 1973 on my Junior class trip from De La Salle Collegiate H.S. When we were allowed some free time, I high-tailed it to 'F' Street and bought some souvenirs for my family. It was a little tattered (Lansburgh's had closed already, Kann's was on the way out, but Woodies was all one would expect of a high-class metropolitan department store, and Garfinckel's was such a beautiful palace of a store, one could imagine Washington Society making a big deal out of shopping there. While none of this was a consistent part of my daily life, I know now that it was for many people like you, if the comments received on this site are any indication.

    Thank you again for sharing memories of a time and place we'll probably never see again.

    BAK

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  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  5. I just found your site looking to see if all the Hecht Co. stores have closed. I remember watching the Landover mall store being built and shopping there (I lived in Landover & the area). We also used to shop at PG Plaza. When I started working in DC, I rode the Metro and would go shopping at the Hecht's and Woodies by getting off the train at Metro Center and going up stairs. Loved those two stores. Hecht's was my favorite. Also, Hecht's had a store/warehouse on New York Ave, in DC, across from the railroad tracks. Drove by it all the time on my way to work or just to go into DC. Is it still there?
    Many times I wish those store were still here. I always found everything I needed in clothes, shoes, gifts.:(

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  6. I too had noticed that this Hecht Company tribute page was missing the mention of the fantastic Hecht Company warehouse located on New York Avenue in NE Washington. That huge building still stands today but it has been vacant for 10-20 years I believe. The art deco style architecture of the building helps to maintain its symbolic presence and a memory of days gone by.

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  7. This is an incredible website. Thank you for creating it. I grew up in DC in the late 40s and 50s and knew all of these department stores very well. My late husband and I used to go to Woodie's almost every Saturday to buy "this or that." It didn't matter what we needed. Woodie's would have it. In the early 60s, my mother was hired as a salesperson at Garfinckel's. Walking into that store was like walking into the Land of Good Taste. Everything was beautiful. Every store had a special appeal for me. When I began to make my own clothes, I made a beeline for Kann's in Arlington, which had the best selection of fabrics. Of the ones that were in DC, only Hecht's is left. Very sad.

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  8. Almost every other Saturday morning, Mom would take me with her to shop. First stop, we parked the car at Hecht's, walked by the candy counter with Mom promising me I could have chocolates when we returned. Sometimes we go right out to F Street to shop at all the stores in the area: Landsburgh's, Kann's, Jellef's Garfinkel's and lunch at "Woodies." I loved their wood paneled dining room with their monogram silverware. We felt like royalty!

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  9. Thank you for creating this wonderful website which has provided a wonderful walk down memory lane. My grandmom and I rode the streetcar from her home in Georgetown to the stores. At Christmastime every year, my Dad drove me and my sisters downtown to see the beautiful window displays. As a teen, I took the bus from our house in Maryland downtown to spend the day shopping. My first job was at 7th and Pennsylvania, so on my lunch hour I would walk up 7th Street to visit Hechts. DC's department stores were wonderful shopping destinations and I so wish I could have shared them with my children as my mom and Grandmom did with me!

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  10. i worked as a Display Trimmer at the DC store in the early 70's -- the salesclerks throughout the store were a great bunch of folks to know-- very friendly. There was a restaurant across the street -- I think it was called Carroll's-- there's a Starbuck's there now. Carrolls had a blue plate special for $3.99 and on our salaries, that was the best place to go to for great food and company. If you were REALLY broke, you could go across the street from Carroll's (7th street) and get a 39 cent hoagie from Kress's 5&10.

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  11. I just learned that my great grandfather worked for the Hecht Co. as a young man in Washington, D.C. Also, I have a love letter written from my grandfather to my grandmother on the inside of a handkerchief box with the Hecht company logo that starts something like "I'm sitting here eating a sandwich..." and proceeds to how he can't quit thinking about her...my family is a D.C. family from way back so Hecht's was part of our life!

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  12. I have a trollie car that has the name Hecht company on it and must have been a promotional. Would like to see if any collectors or museum about the Hecht would be interested in the tin car which is in very good condition. It was found in an actic on Park Ave in 1973.

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  13. I used to work for hechts at the fair oaks mall i started as a sales person and worked my way up to ASM i would love to find my old co workers. My name Brad and i managed womens petite's, i worked there from 1991 to 1995 i really miss those people

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  14. Hi,
    I'd like to contact someone who worked in the Hecht's in Towson, MD in the 1980s. Would you have any information on the staff at the beauty salon there? Or is there a Baltimore contact who might be able to help find this person? We got along so well and I've always wondered what he's doing now.
    Linda

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  15. During the Christmas season during the 1960's a handsewer from Commonwealth Shoe & Leather (Bostonian Shoes) would sew shoes in the window of the F street store. My Dad was the sales rep for the company. He would take us downtown to watch the handsewer at work. I can't remember the man's name - Marc something, but we loved watching him create.

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  16. I worked in the Furs and Coat Dept. at Hecht's Landmark in the 1970s. Since I wasn't full time they didn't have to even pay minimum wage. I think I got $1.70 an hour. The furs were in a locked glass case back against the wall in the coat department. During the warmer months when the coat dept. was quiet, they transferred me over to the wedding invitations and stationary area. It's hard to think of what they DIDN'T sell at Hecht's.

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  17. Hecht's was the last of the local department stores. It's unfortunate that Macy's brought all the department stores from May Department stores and changed them all to Macy's. There's nothing special about Macy's. I remember in the late '80s, Macy's didn't want to open their stores in the Washington, DC Metro area. Fast forward to 2006, all Hecht's is now Macy's.
    Macy's should have kept the local department stores keep their names. Ex: Hecht's (a division of Macy's). Two Macy's (Macy's 1 and Macy's 2) at Fair Oaks Mall. Even though it's a Macy's
    now, it will always be a Hecht's.

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  18. I have a "coin/token" with "The Hecht Co" on one side and a number on the reverse side. What were these used for?

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  19. The Hecht Co. was my favorite store. I came to DC from MN in 1951, and every spring I would be thrilled to see the beautiful 50's style dresses. They had a bright fitting room with a window and I'd try on clothes for hours!

    Then in about 1959, I worked in the Toy Dept and wore the red top as "Santa's helper". It was really enjoyable to work with the toys, as I had a daughter about 2 yrs old, so I was very interested in what was appealing to children.

    Every Saturday, I would take the bus downtown and stroll up and down F and G streets to all the shopsl I'd go to the Waffle House on 11th st and have coffee and pie and listen to the juke box.

    I am sorry for what has happened to the downtown area. It is now unrecognizable!

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  20. I started working at the 7th & F st. store in the summer of '64. Worked in the Maintenance Dept. We did just about everthing. Lot's of fond memories. Did some time at most of the other store as well (but not in the Va. locations) PG Plaza, Silver Spring, Landover, Tysons. We had a road crew that took care of the stores that didn't have permanent maint. people.

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  21. I work at the Hecht co. 1964 as teenager I loved my job as a stock boy in appliances

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  22. I still have a belted, "furry" lined suede coat with faux fur collar and cuffs I bought my first winter living in Silver Spring back in 1975. It's seen a lot of winters and kept me so warm in Alabama and Georgia since then and still looks as good as the day I bought it. Don't care at all whether it's in style or not, not with such a terrific coat. Money well spent at Hechts.

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  23. Dear Sharon, Thank you so much for reminding me of Neisner's! That was a magical trolley stop, where you could pop into Neisner's and get a crab cake at the deli counter, and eat it waiting for the trolley. The year was 1955 and I went regularly to get my braces tightened, with the reward of going downtown all alone and walking to this magic corner. Fast forward to 1958 and my junior prom dress from Woody's! Then Hecht's provided my wedding dress (same guy as prom!) in 1964. What a wonderful time.

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  24. 50s and 60s My mother worked at Hecht's and every payday Friday I would ride the Streetcar downtown and meet her when she got off work and we would shop and eat dinner! Happy Memories!

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  25. I remember going with my mother to the Hecht's on F street. he three things that stand out in my mind are hot peanut center at entrance, the bargain basement and the restaurant upstairs. What a wonderful experience!

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  26. I worked at Hecht's from 1978 until Macy's laid me off in 2010 after 32 years. Hecht's was the greatest place to work. They had the nicest salespeople and managers. I was hired by Ellie Miskovic at Hecht's in Prince George's Plaza. They were the greatest team. Ellie, Paul Wright, and Jim Williamson. I worked in Domestics on the 2nd floor next to lingerie with Sapeinza Barone, Jim Picklo, Janice Porter. We had the best times. The customers were like family. Hecht's had good benefits and job security. I remember Blanche Kirchoff and the awesome Mrs Gado in Remark. Those were the best days.

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  27. I have an old Hecht Co. Ski Shop pin from Washington, D. C. that I would be willing to part with at a nominal fee...any interest out there? Cliff218@gmail.com

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  28. I started working at the Down town Hecht Co store in 1977. We were all a big family. I continued working at Hecht's until the Macy's so call merger. After realizing Macy's has a name and that's about it, I left retail. I've been trying to locate a girl I dated in display in the 1978-79 era named Trish. I was told she married a military guy so I have no idea where to find her. Trish if you see this email me at dan031520@gmail.com. I'd love to catch up with you. Always was curious what you did with your life

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  29. Im trying to get some information I have an cross stitch on a Canvas and on the back of the canvas it says This is a hand made canvas panel frames to fit this canvas panel in stock
    THE HECHT CO. Artist Materials Depts WASHINGTON. BALTIMORE 16x20 has a cross stitch of the royal guards and big ben and other things... the Artist initials is clo or No and the year is 68

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  30. I still have my Hecht Co charge card first received in 1975. I also have some Hecht Co gift certificates from 1988. All put away for safekeeping. :)

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