Joseph Horne Co., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania








Joseph Horne Co.
501 Penn Avenue at Stanwix Street
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222

GRant 1-4000







Street Floor
Cosmetic Beautiques • Cosmetics • Fragrances • Perfumes • Better Jewelry • Real Jewelry • Fine Jewelry • Watches • Fashion Jewelry • Fashion Accessories • Shoe-In • Stockings • Scarves • Small Leathers • Handbags • Les Must de Cartier • Headwear • Street Floor Sportswear • Street Floor Lingerie • Blouses • Shoes on One • Stationery • Candy • Games • Books • Street Floor Clocks • Horne’s Gourmet Corner • Horne’s Tea Room
The Men’s Store Men’s Furnishings • Men’s Gifts • Men’s Dress Furnishings • Men’s Gifts • Men’s Sport Furnishings • Men’s Street Floor Sportswear • Men’s Bar


Balcony
Personal Service Bureau • Cashiers • Optique • Tick Tock • Calculators • Radios • Stereos • Television • Beauty Salon


Second Floor
Penwick Dresses • Penwick Coats • Glendale Shop Dresses • Glendale Shop Coats • Glendale Shop Sportswear • Glendale OntheGo • Collegienne Sportswear • Collegienne Dresses • Collegienne Coats • Collegienne Shoes • Collegienne Millinery • College-Town • Second Floor Shoes • Naturalizer • Millinery


Third Floor
The Men’s Store Men’s Clothing • Outerwear • Contemporary Sportswear • Tailored Sportswear • The Stanbrooke Shop • Men’s Sportswear • Men’s Updated Sportswear • Men’s Shoes • Men’s Hats • Young Men
Young World Girls 4-6x • Girls 7-14 • Hi-SHop • Young Juniors • Young World Accessories • Kids’ Stuff • Boys’ Clothing • Boys’ Furnishings • NFL Shop • Infants • Toddlers • Children’s Shoes
Luggage • Cameras • Sporting Goods  Pet Shop


Fourth Floor
Peacock Lane Galleries of Fashion • Galleries Pavilion • Galleries Boutique • Galleries Coats • Shoe Galleries • Fur Galleries • Bridal Galleries • Regency Room • Country Place • Designer Sportswear • Young Designer • American Designer Bazaar • Upfront • Plaza 4 • Miss Horne Shop • Misses’ Dresses • Coat Salon • Suit Salon • All-Weather Coats • Galleries Lingerie • Peacock Lane Millinery
Slippers • Lingerie • Underfashions • Fashion Foundations • Robes • Loungewear • Sleepfashions • Miss Horne Lingerie • House and Town Dresses


Fifth Floor
Gifts • Artificial Flowers • Sliver • China and Glass • Table Linens • Crystal • Carlin Shop • Bath Shop • Towels • Bed Linens • Blankets • Draperies • Fashion Fabrics • Needlework • White-Elna Sewing Center • Floor Coverings • Area Rugs • Lamps • Pictures


Sixth Floor
Furniture Galleries • Furniture • Recliners • Sleep Shop • Casual Furniture • Music Center • Williamsburg Craft House


Seventh Floor
Housewares • Cookware • Hospitality • Small Electrics • Appliances • Vacuums • Plantation • Affordable Furniture • Clocks • Cleaning Aids • Garden Shop • Hardware • Paints • Home Improvement Center • Sporting Goods • Ski Shop • Toys • Assembly Hall


Liberty and Olive Streets
The Music Center


(741,000 s.f.)



Mt. Lebanon
Washington Road at Central Square
1945

Whitehall Terrace
Brentwood-Whitehall
1951
70,000  sq. ft.

Heights Plaza
Natrona Heights
1956
73,000 sq. ft.

Northway Mall
Ross Township
1962
250,000 sq.ft.



East Hills

1960


South Hills Village

1965
260,000 sq. ft.


Greengate Mall

1965
185,000 sq. ft.

Monroeville Mall
Monroeville, Pennsylvania
1969
241,000 sq. ft.

Beaver Valley Mall
Monaca, Pennsylvania
1970
194,000 sq. ft.

Southern Park Mall
Youngstown, Ohio
1970
188,000 sq. ft.

Great Lakes Mall
Mentor, Ohio
1974
118,000 sq. ft.

Randall Park Mall
Randall Heights, Ohio
1976
163,000 sq. ft.






Coming in due course.






93 comments:

  1. I am searching for a picture of Joseph Horne's door man. He was reported to be so tall that Barnum & Bailey wanted him to be part of their exhibition. Anyone with an image please email to Teacherturner@aol.com. He is my ancestor.

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  2. I have a horne's "h" from one of the signs at Beaver Valley Mall. It was lighted from behind. It is about 4.5' tall. If interested, contact me at mentzerks@aol.com.

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  3. I am looking for photos of the old horne's dpt. store that anchored in the former east hills shopping center. of course before it closed. to help support a screenplay i'm writing about east hills. any one with a image please email to derek1st.talentfilmproductions@gmail.com thank you

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  4. I am looking for a photo's of the old joseph horne's dpt. store from the former east hills shopping ctr. for a screenplay i'm doing on east hills. please send me photo's to derek1st.talentfilmproductions@gmail.com thank you

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  5. I am looking for shopping bags or boxes from the last year or so that Horne's was in business. Please contact at pghkmh2@yahoo.com and place hornes in subject line. thanks

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  6. There was a Horne's at Ross Park Mall. It opened in 1986 shortly after the rest of the mall opened. The space was supposed to be a Gimbel's, but the chain went bankrupt before it could open its new store. Horne's was planning to remain at Northway Mall, but decided to move when the space became available. Initially, Horne's remained at Northway on the lower level selling furniture and home goods. However, they closed this operation a few years later and focused exclusively on the Ross Park store. The Ross Park store became a Lazarus in 1994 when the chain was purchased. The former Horne's at Ross Park was demolished to make way for Nordstrom shortly after the Federated-May merger was completed.

    To the poster above me--the Horne's bags of the late 1980s and 1990s were beige with blue stripes and the word "horne's" in lowercase (along with the signature double horn logo). Boxes from the time period were blue with only the name, written diagonally in the lower right-hand corner. I know I have a bag somewhere but at this time am not planning on parting with it.

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  7. I haven't looked for my bag yet, but I also have a red tin from Horne's. In the old days, department stores sold candy (even the suburban locations). This one is a plain red tin with a gold sticker on it, featuring a blue Horne's logo and name. I'm pretty sure it's from the late 1980s--it was my grandmother's but the marketing on it looks to be from that time. I do remember getting candy at Horne's in the 1980s--the selection was always good. (I always opted for the bags over the tin).

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  8. there was also Westgate Mall in Cleveland formerly a Halle's location then Hornes.

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  9. My grandmother worked at Horne's in either Pittsburgh or Mt. Lebanon as a Comparison Buyer during the Depression. I don't have any special info for you. Just that she would visit other stores to find out their prices, and report back to Joseph horne's so they could adjust their prices.

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  10. Steven M. Plavny11 February, 2011 23:29

    I had the privilege to work at Joseph Horne Co. selling men's clothing and fragrances during the early 80s in their Downtown Flagship Store. What a class store! New York's famous department stores had nothing on Hornes. From the gilded ceilings on the first floor to the blue clouds handpainted on the ceilings of the elevators and the crisp linens and immaculate place settings in the Tea Room, it was a beautiful, classy place to shop and dine, especially during Horne's annual spring flower show or at Christmastime.

    Joseph Horne's merchandise was the best too. From Cartier watches and Yves St. Laurent Rive Gauche in the Fourth Floor's Galleries of Fashion to Jaeger British Sportswear and, of course, Hornes' own handipped chocolates, it was first class all the way.

    And who could forget Horne's annual Symphony Fashion Gala? The fashion fete was truly one of the high points in Pittsburgh's social season for many, many years. And to my knowledge, hasn't been replicated since.

    It's truly a shame that today's young people never had the thrill of dressing up to go Downtown to shop and spend the day at Hornes. Gone are the days of real customer service, store charge plates, doormen, tissue paper and boxes w/each purchase and next day parcel delivery not to mention smiling well dressed and groomed salespeople. Today's big box stores are nothing in comparision. Those were the days!

    Steven M. Plavny
    -- Former sales associate and loyal patron of Joseph Horne Co.

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  11. Dear Steven:

    Thank you for your kind comments about Joseph Horne Co. Years ago, I received Christmas catalogues from Joseph Horne Co., and from that small experience, it was clear what kind of institution Horne's was. Your comments only serve to confirm my earlier belief.

    A few years ago, I attended a wedding in Pittsburgh, so I dragged my wife across the river to go to Kaufmann's (Macy's by then) and we did pass by the beautiful old Joseph Horne building on Stanwix Street. How sad it seemed to me, and if ever there was a case for the existence of "ghosts," I would say that the empty, disused image presented by the building, at the very least, stood in stark contrast to the many wonderful things that went on there on a daily basis.

    As you say, those were the days, and at least there are memories. Thanks for sharing them in such a positive way.

    BAK

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  12. I worked at the Joseph Horne Co flagship store in the mid 60's in the Visual Merchandising dept and was part of that magical time when, especially at Christmas, the main floor was transformed into a Christmas fantasy.

    If anyone is interested in any info I may have, please communicate.

    (PS I also did the same at Kaufmann's a number of years later).

    san9d@yahoo.com

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  13. I have a number of items that, I am told, came from the downtown location.

    These items include:
    -The flags that hung from the side of the building down Stanwix St. and Penn Ave. (circa 1970's)
    -18 pieces of very large (58"x90 1/2"x1/2") curved glass featuring the trademark double horn logo
    -The indoor Christmas tree, seasonally displayed on the first floor.

    If anyone has pictures of these items in their hay-day or any other detailed information regarding them, please contact me.

    I'd be happy to send pictures of them or show them to any interested party. They are currently located in Lawrenceville Pa.

    pdtsolutions@gmail.com

    Thank you-

    Patrick Tracy

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  14. Hello I have a kitchen hutch I bought at an auction. It say Cecil Joseph Horne Co housewares department. I has a flour sifter and a tin bread box and enamel top that pulls out for a work space. can anyone help me find out more info and maybe what it is worth. I can send a picture. please help me! my name is K'leen and my e-mail is kcugs@comcast.net

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  15. BAK,

    Great website! Thank you for capturing these "moments in time"!!

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  16. We recently aquired the red and yellow drapes that we believe hung in the two-story store front of the Jospeh Horne's Downtown Pittsburgh store. Anyone interested in these treasures should drop me an email at talsnoopy@yahoo.com. They have been well preserved!

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  17. I worked at Horne's from 1985 to 1994 and only have wonderful memories of this majestic department store. Thanks for setting up this site to preserve the fact that such a place did REALLY exist. In the days when Target and Walmart are considered department stores, it is hard to believe there was a place like Horne's.

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  18. Anyone remember the year (late 60's/early 70's) when Horne's used Scrooge as their Christmas advertising on the cover of their catalog and the real gift boxes (not pop up). All in full color.

    Looking forward to your memories and comments.

    RAS

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  19. Debbie in FL now, Pitts before24 November, 2011 00:44

    As a young child I used to hide in the circular clothes racks. Mom didn't panic back then in the 50's and 60's, She just said my name and out I came. Also the delectible restaurant in the downtown Pittsburgh store. What a treat! Santa and the little childrens area where they set up a place for the kids to buy their parents a gift. I still have the pin I chose for mom. What a fine store! And those chocolate mints! Yum. Wasn't the balcony called the mezzanine?

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  20. Debbie,

    The restaurant was known as the "Tearoom" before being changed to "Josephine's". The children's area for shopping at Christmas was "Santa's Secret Gift Shop" on the 7th floor. Yes, the balcony was called the mezzanine.

    Take care and Happy Holidays,

    Dick

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  21. Hello, I was just given a vintage blonde colored Fur coat from my grandma for Christmas. The tag says "Joseph Horne CO Pittsburgh. CAn anyone help me get more information about this coat? Thank you Ann - iwitness@weartheword.net

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  22. I just came across the Scrooge poster from a long ago Joseph Horne Co Christmas theme. I have hard backed it so it no longer rolls but if anyone is interested in it, let me know.

    wbhowe@comcast.net

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  23. Hi wbhowe, thanks for the message. Would love to see the image. I interpret that 'hard back' means printed on a stable surface.

    Thanks, Dick

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  24. Bonnie Jan. 19, 2012


    I just bought a four drawer desk( from an auction) with the paperwork stating it was from Joseph Horne Co., Pittsburgh. It weighs a ton and in in great shape.... What a steal for $25.00!

    mulvaneyj@bellsouth.net

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  25. I have a childs brown leather, button up shoe. It has a tag inside with Josph Horne Co. Pittsburg on the inside. I was wandering if I can find out more about the shoe. I dont want to get rid of it but was just wandering its worth. If anyone knows any info or where to find it, please let me know. Thanks

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  26. I recently found dishes that are marked "made expressly for Jos. Horne Co. Pittsburgh Pa." They also have the Limoges,France mark of two banners & flying bird,which is ca. 1891. They are white with a green key design around the parimeter, with gold trim around the rims. Their condition is near mint. I have 4 complete place settings along with extra pieces. A complete setting consists of dinner plate, bread/salad plate, cup and saucer, soup bowl, dessert/berry bowl and butter pat. Does anyone know - were the dishes made for sale at Hornes or were they made to be used at Hornes in the restaurants - and the approximate age? The butter pat in particular leads me to believe they were possibly made in the 1930's. I'm picture challenged on the internet but if anyone is interested I can text you photos. I am in the south hills area of Pittsburgh and treasure my Hornes memories; particularly the tea room. I never minded waiting in line with my mom for a table, because the book section was near the entrance and I'd go there and browse till my mom reached the entrance of the tea room. I always hoped we'd get a space around the edges with the nifty pull out tables!

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  27. As I type this I'm sitting in a hotel room in the Residence Inn/Milwaukee - which is the old Gimbels Building. Glad they didn't tear it down, but how sad that we have so very few "Department" Stores left.

    REAL Department stores from the past, that is.

    Scott S.

    I grew up in Pittsburgh and remember going shopping with my Mother and Aunts at Joseph Horne, Gimbels, Kaufmanns, Rosenbaums, and Boggs & Buhl. Horne' was my favorite. Because I saw an orthodontist in the Oliver Building every two to three weeks, we would have lunch in the Tick-Tock room or the Tea room or one of many others. Starched napkins and tablecloths -- china plates and cups and saucers - fine silverware -- it really was an opportunity for a parent to teach their children 'manners' and 'table etiquette.' One spoke in hushed tones -- sat up straight - and showed politeness while in one of these fine restaurants.

    The Horne 'Balcony' or Mezzanine was a great place to meet or wait for your friends while shopping - I recall beautiful, comfortable sofas and armchairs - end tables and lamps - and of course, everyone dressed to shop back then. (...we've become a nation of slobs, I'm afraid....) I remember the steps leading up to the balcony were actually worn to the point that there were indentations in the treads from years of people going up and down the stairs. I remember the special telephone booths....and the package check desk.

    A special treat for a young fella was to go around the corner by the elevators - on the Balcony, the doors were glass - so you could watch the inner workings of the elevators as they went up and down the shafts. The showcases and other store fixtures were elegant and finely crafted.....and I can still recall the various fragrances as you walked thru the store - floor by floor....

    I remember my Aunt INSISTING that we have our purchases 'delivered' rather than us taking them home with us. She'd say "one of these days, you won't be able to get goods delivered - so take advantage of it now!" How right she was. Frankly, I can't imagine Aunt Edith or Aunt Florence being able to understand a Walmart or a Target - and they'd be horrified to see how some people go out in public dressed so terribly. My how times have changed.

    Once my sister got her driver's license, many Friday or Saturday Evenings were spent at the Northway Mall (a visit to Hornes, of course) We thought the fountains and pools of water and the various landscaping indoors was simply amazing.....BUT -- people still dressed up to go shopping albeit a bit more casual.

    I live in Detroit now - J.L. Hudson is no more - just like Hornes and Gimbels and John Wanamaker (Philadelphia) -- but when I get back to the 'Steel City' - I make it a point to go to Kaufmanns - it's a shadow of its former self - but it's still a magnificent old building....(go to the top-most open floor - and in one corner you'll still find one of the old wooden-treaded escalators still there - it no longer runs, but it's still there!

    And - for anyone travelling to Philadelphia - you must stop by the old John Wanamaker Store (now Macy's on Market and Broad - the magnificent Pipe organ is still there - it's still played each day - but unfortunately only two or three floors are open for business. And as for the salespeople? Well - let's put it this way: They'd have been fired within 5 minutes back in the 60s.....

    Thanks for a GREAT site - and for allowing us all to share our memories with each other!

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  28. Every city, in its day, had one store that stood out; for Pittsburgh it was Horne's. I visited the downtown store twice in the mid 80s, first when it was part of ADG, then afterwards when it was privately held. The store was stunning, it was grand and it had an elegance that Kaufmann's did not have. Part of this was due to the fact that ADG NEVER spent money on store upkeep, so the store looked like it was stuck in its heyday of the 50s...but that was alright. The staff was knowledgeable, polite and courteous. It is said that when Macy's purchased the chain (gee, a common feeling by most people), they not only turned it into Lazarus, but they closed the old store, and erected this modern store that barely lasted 5 years before closing it. The people of Pittsburgh, who once had a bustling downtown with an amazing selection of retailers at its core, are now reduced to just Macy's (in the old Kaufmann location).

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  29. ex-buyer,

    Thank-you for your comment. Horne's was an amazing store and experience. I worked in the flagship store for a relatively short period of time in the Visual Department. It was an amazing collection of creative and fun people in a beautiful environment to be creative. It will always be one of my favorite jobs. I only departed because I returned to college. (I was there post Warhol, however). If anyone is interested, I have some great insights into the operation as I knew some of the management at, what I consider, to be its height.

    Dick

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  30. Thank you, Dick, for your insight . . . along with thanks to Tom for his on Joseph Horne Co.

    I was never lucky enough to visit Horne's, but on a recent trip to Pittsburgh, rode past the once-elegant old store. The typical sense of pervasive sadness reigned, and the creation and maintenance of this site are my way of at least keeping the memories alive.

    From ads and catalogs, I had the impression that Horne's was very fine indeed, and I wish that I had access to pictures of the store's street floor, tea room, and its other defining aspects. Perhaps some day they will come to light.

    It is interesting to read about Horne's in the Pittsburgh Gazette, and I was very happy to find a clean version of the logo that graces the top of this page, one that, for a person from quite far away, indicates, for me at least, the status of this marvelous, dignified, and truly-missed store.

    Bruce

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  31. It would be great to have some kind of reunion of ex-Joseph Horne Co. employees.

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  32. Dear Anonymous,

    That sounds like an interesting idea. I think it may be difficult to locate such a diverse and specialized group of people. A possible source of information could be old copies of the in-house newsletter "The Horne Piper" or, a stretch, records from Camp Horne, the employee retreat, in Ross Township.

    I am in California and worked in the downtown store in the late 60's and haven't any idea where any co-workers may be. Richard Pivoroto, husband of Mimi Burchfield, was the president/ceo of the company at that time. He later became ceo of ADG and has since passed away at his home in CT.

    Dick

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  33. i have just came across a travel trunk from the joseph horne co. there are 4more from the same house are they worth getting . they are beautiful . thanks

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  34. A friend of mine used to order Chocolate Easter Eggs that had a hard chocolate shell on the outside and the smoothest, creamiest chocolate on the inside with bits of walnut in it--does anyone know if you can still get them anywhere today? They were the best!

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  35. Dear A,

    I am not sure if you can still buy the same eggs you referred to but I do know that Horne's received their candy from Betsy Ann Candies in West View. Since I no longer live in Pittsburgh, I have no idea if Betsy Ann is still in business. Good luck in your quest, I hope you are successful.

    Dick

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  36. Dick and A, Betsy Ann Candy from West View still sells the pecan meltaway Easter eggs you mentioned. They also have a website, where you can order on-line. Betsy Ann also provided the fine chocolates found at H & S Pogue's Marketplace - and probably did so for most of the ADG stores.

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  37. I worked at Joseph Horne's from 1959 to 1963 fresh out of College!!! I was hired to work on the "Flying Squad". We were sent to work in the various departments as needed. Eventually I became the Staff Asst. in the Infants and Childrens Dept. on the Third Floor and eventually the Assistant Buyer. The Dept. became very large so they decided to split it and I was very disappointed when the new buyer who was appointed came from womens Lingerie to head the new dept. My merchandise mgr. told me since I was recently engaged and would be getting married soon, I could not have the new department!!! So I was transferred to the "Downstairs Store" to work in the Childrens 3 to 6x Dept!!!Many time I have thought that I should have fought for that buying job!!! However, I did marry and my husband and I raised five children. I wasvery fortunate to stay home to raise my children.
    I would like to comment that looking back,I look on my four years at Horne's very fondly. I learned so much from the buyers. They demanded hard work but never asked you to do what they themselves would not do. It was truly a great privilege to work for the Joseph Horne Co.

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  38. I'm looking for information from the 1920's when my Dad, Max Walske worked for Joseph Horne's at the downtown original store and went abroad often as a buyer of men's suits; also a woman whose first name was Catherine who also worked there in the 1920's. Thanks Ethel

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  39. Looking for information on Joseph Horne's from the 1920's, specifically on Max Walske and a woman named Catherine who both worked there. He was a buyer for men's suits and went abroad in the 1920's for the store, among other duties.

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  40. I seem to remember a really bad flick on television which featured a female department store employee being hunted down by a rapist in the closed and darkened store. I know it was Horne's because they ended up running around the roof store sign. Hardly a promotion for such a fine store. Does anyone else remember this bad movie??

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  41. The movie was "Lady Beware"

    Lady Beware is a 1987 American thriller film, directed by Karen Arthur. It stars Diane Lane, Michael Woods, and Cotter Smith. The film is marketed with the tagline "When fantasy leads to terror." It was filmed on location in and around Pittsburgh.

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  42. Does anyone have a store directory form Horne's or Kaufmann's downtown that they are willing to sell? Please let me know. Thanks!

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  43. My brother has a vintage icebox from Joseph Horn was wondering what it;s worth,does anyone have any idea? where can i get information on this.My email address is melvin1202@yahoo.com

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  44. melvin1202,

    Try a local antique store or antique mall to get an estimate of the value of the icebox.

    Dick

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  45. I just happened upon this site and am so disappointed that Horne's is no longer. I attened Point Park College in the mid-seventies and we absolutely loved dressing up and going shopping...which for us was more browsing and enjoying the ambiance. Many special occasions and achievements were celebrated by lunch in the tearoom. I hope the building will be put on the historic register and something magnificent done with it to honor its legacy.

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  46. I am sorry to say that Horne's is now occupied by Hi Mark/Blue Cross Blue Shield and used as office space. The original bronze plaque remains on the building at the corner of Penn and Stanwix.

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  47. Nancy Thompson Handler17 July, 2012 18:39

    My father, Ralph Thompson, was the buyer for Penwick Coats and Suits for many years. He was a wonderful man and whenever I would pull out our "gold" charge plate, all the sales people would ask me if I was his daughter and tell me how much they loved my dad. He started as a stock boy during the Depression and worked there his entire working life. As a little kid, we would go to Camp Horne in the summers. During the depression, employees camped there and were taken to and from the store in buses. I loved picnicing, swimming, playing shuffleboard and watching the shows and have a few pictures taken there if anyone is interested.

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  48. Nancy,

    A great memory from an outstanding store and the manner in which the employees were respected. Remember it well as a distant past.

    Dick

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  49. My mother worked at Horne's in the 40's (?)I have pictures of Slim Byrant & His Wildcats performing at the Horne picnic in 1949. Also have pictures of the Price family. I would love to send these pictures to someone---is there a museum in Pittsburg that would take them?

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  50. Try the Heinz Museum at this address:

    http://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/

    I am sure they would be pleased to have them.

    Dick

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  51. Try the Heinz Museum at:

    http://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/

    I am sure they would be pleased to have the photos.

    Dick

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  52. Thank you so much! I just sent them an e-mail. I know my mom had a few more items so I will look for those.

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  53. You are most welcome. We need to preserve the past to proceed into the future.

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  54. Thanks again for your help. I did get a response from The Heinz History Center; they said they would love to have the pictures as they had a lot of Horne's records and photos. Some of your readers might like to know that if they were looking for something in particular. I have a copy of The Horne-Pipe(Feb 18 1949) that I am sending them also. I'm so happy to have found a place for these items. thanks again! Sandy

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  55. Glad I was able to be of assistance. Please pass the word along should you find someone else with information or memorabilia.

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  56. I stumbled upon this page by accident. I have made comments on this blog about Bonwit Teller . I am in NJ and never heard of Horne's but it sounds like it was another grand dept. Store swallowed and closed by the unfortunate fate of time. I was prompted to google this dept. Store when i discovered a price tag on a pair of art moderne terra cotta satues i have and love. How nice to know they came from such a fabulous store. Joe Licata

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  57. As the unofficial spokesman of the former Horne's dept store, thank you for your comment. It was a great store. Swallowed, as you said, by Lazarus which also failed when they opened a store in downtown.

    With the resurgence of downtown areas across the country, many stores will be opening in those areas but not in the the grand manner in which they originally existed. Time moves on and so does retail.

    Dick

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  58. I also grew up north of Pgh. and remember fond memories of Joseph Horne, Gimbels and Kaufmanns in the late 50's and early 60's. I would love to find some recipes, especially Angel Pie from Joseph Horne, and any from Gimbel's (chocolate covered strawberries)or from Kaufmann's. Any clue as to find these recipes would be helpful.
    Thanks, csb1941@verizon.net

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  59. Hi- in 1970/72 I worked in stock at the Horne's Whitehall store. I was in the DECA program in high school and that store and all the wonderful folks who worked there - well they still live in my memories. Loading the UPS truck, the metal bins from the downtown store loaded with fresh bake goods, keeping busy bringing up tv's stereos, lamps I just loved all of it. So sad its gone now.

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  60. I recently bought a pair Italian Joseph Horne leather gloves....they are in excellent condition I can provide pictures if someone could give me some information on them I would greatly appreciate it my emai is jda1010@sru.edu

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  61. I worked at the Downtown Joseph Horne Co. in the Display Department during the early 1980's Renaissance of Downtown Pittsburgh.
    I must disagree with the prior post, declaring that ADG "never spent money on upkeep". More accurately; the store's management, which still included members of the Horne family (Burchfield) and the director of display ( John Brown) had a great deal of taste and respect for the historic quality of the interiors. They did, in fact spend a great deal of time and effort restoring the main sales floor to it's original turn-of-the-century grandeur (removing some of 1950's and 60's alterations)...and the rest of the building was very well maintained with every corner, constantly styled by the artistic members of the large display staff.

    Definitely an era, lost to the history books. The "Spring Flower show" was an event that no modern Department Store could ever rival, with thousands of dollars spent every year to turn the main sales floor into a themed garden, complete with fountains, trees, masses of flowers and even one year; tropical butterflies !

    I have available some photographs of various interiors and images of some of the most spectacular display windows from the period.
    You may contact me here if you are interested: mheinznyc@aol.com

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  62. My Grandfather, George Papanickolas, was the head chef for the downtown store for many years. I still have his knives and a 100th anniversary plate

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  63. I worked at South Hills Village store for several years in the 80's. The store manager was Jim Clagg. He was a wonderful, no nonsense manager and I learned so much from him. I really miss Hornes quality,Hornes Customer Service and the great friends I made there.

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  64. Avonworth Community Park located in Ohio Township and Kilbuck Township was originally owned by Horne's as a retreat for their employees. It was sold to the 5 communities that make up the Avonworth School District in the 1960s.

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  65. Does anyone know what happened to the 4 or 5 branch locations that Horne's operated in Ohio. Are they still open? I believe that they were Higbee's and then Dillards and were acquired in some sort of legal settlement. Anyone have any details?

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  66. I bought my wedding gown at Horne's in 1986 on the 4th floor in the downtown Pgh store. My mother bought her wedding gown there in 1955. I still have the wonderful memory of going to Horne's with my mother to buy my wedding gown.

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  67. I have the original Marklin train display that was used in the store window at Christmas to promote the Marklin trains in the toy/hobby area in the downtown store at penn and stanwix.

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  68. Appreciated your comment regarding the Marklin train display used in the Christmas window. Do you remember the year/s?

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  69. I worked for Horne's in the 80's, in the accounting department, then went to work for Dave Kaplan in the Horne's Commercial Interiors Division, down on Seventh Avenue. Oh, the joy of receiving your first employee discount card!

    I have two Christmas copies of the "Horne Pipe" the company newsletter. For Christmas, the back of the newsletter was printed with a lovely Christmas-themed picture, suitable for display.

    I also have two "service award" pins, one goldtone, one silvertone, with the double horn logo; two original Snowy Joey bears (1987), a Snowy Joey mug, Snowy Joey puzzles, Snowy Joey underwear, a box of Snowy Joey shopping bags; and a throw (blanket) with an image of the Horne's Christmas tree on it.

    Josephine's closed in the mid to late 80's and was reopened as Max and Erma's around 1989. I wish someone had pictures of the interior of Josephine's; there's never been another restaurant as beautiful or elegant.

    During my time at Horne's, the Mezzanine held the hair salon and optical department. I remember getting my first pair of contact lenses there.

    As a kid, we were always intrigued with the floor-button "flushers" in the ladies room. I can still see those brass "buttons" on the floors in the stalls. Wonder if Highmark kept them?

    I wonder how much of the beautiful architecture of the original building was maintained when Old Navy and then Highmark moved in?

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  70. I forgot to add, the store numbers were as follows: #1 Main store; #2 Great Lakes; #3 Whitehall; #4 Natrona Heights; #5 East Hills; #6 Northway; #7 Green Gate Mall; #8 South Hills Village; #9 Monroeville Mall; #10 Beaver Valley Mall; #11 Southern Park; #12 Randall Park; #13 Warehouse; #14 West Erie; #15 Millcreek; #16 Century III; #17 Westgate; #18 Ross Park Mall; #19 Severance Town Center. I looked at those numbers on purchase orders on a daily basis for years.

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  71. Going to Hornes was such a treat as a child, and I even modeled in a fashion show there. We would park across the Monongahela River and ride the "T" into town for a day of shopping... In later years we would go the the Century III store or South Hills Village store, but nothing was a special as the flagship downtown.

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  72. I remember as a child having breakfast in the Tea Room with Mr. Rogers and shopping in Santa's Secret Gift Shop for presents for my parents - with money they gave me to spend! We would drive downtown and look at the Christmas decorations in the windows after every Thanksgiving meal. Years later, my Mom was a receptionist in the Decorating Dept. on the 6th floor and I worked nights in the Auditing Dept. It was located in the building next door to Horne's, but we entered through Horne's employee entrance and walked through the store. We had to call the guard station prior to leaving to make sure the dogs weren't roaming the store before we left.

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  73. I purchased at a thrift store a black patent leather handbag that says "Joseph Horne and Co. Pittsburg" It has the most wonderful suede interior! Who would have made the bag for Horne's?

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  74. I came across this site which I hope can provide some information. My grandfather gave my mother a Baseball charm engraved 1931 JH Co. he told my mother that all the ball players received them. The team he was referring to was the Homestead grays. We think the JH Co. stands for Joseph Horne Company. Possibly a sponsor or advertiser for the 1931 Homestead grays

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  75. With luck, perhaps someone from Horne's or a Pittsburgh sports enthusiast can answer this question - I would also look at the Pittsburgh newspapers at Google News Archive and see if there is anything there to confirm your hypothesis.

    Good luck!

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  76. So happy I found this web site! I enjoyed reading everyone s wonderful memories of Joseph Horne's. My dad, Jim Clagg, was the manager of the South Hills Village store from it's opening till he died in 1989. Prior to that he worked at several of the other branch stores. My 2 brothers and I also worked at the South Hills Village store when we were teenagers. And thank you to the person that left the comment about my dad ,describing him as wonderful but no nonsense! A perfect description!

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  77. I just helped my sister clean out some of our mothers items from her home. We found a very nice pair of "The HIGBEE CO." #65 Size 6 A wooden lady's shoe forms. If interested please send me an email. mj29pa@msn.com

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  78. I am so glad son sent me the link for this site. I used to love to go downtown on the bus with my mother and later "my car" taking mom and my kids to see the Christmas window displays. Many many happy memories.

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  79. @Anonymous - your comment above from FEB, 2013. Jim Clagg was my dad. You probably knew me, too as I worked there in my younger years. I miss Hornes at SHV anytime I drive by, but we've been in Houston, TX for almost 17 years. I still miss yunz, the Stillers and dem Pyrrets.

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  80. In the early 1960's, the Joseph Horne Company sponsored a high school council consisting of male and female students from public and private schools across Allegheny County. In 1963 the entire group was invited to attend a sneak preview of the movie "Bye, Bye Birdie" and also to appear in a full page clothing ad in the Pittsburgh Press. Four boys and I were invited to model Horne's styles on Bill Cardille's Saturday teenage TV show, "Twixt Twelve and Twenty" and another handful of us worked in the young adult shops in the downtown store during August. The buyer for clothes was Jerry Wroblewski, a great fellow who could talk to teens easily and earnestly. At the end of that stint -- Saturday, August 17th -- there was a big fashion show in the 7th floor events center featuring Horne's summer and fall apparel. If anyone has a list of the high school council members for 1962-1963, please forward it to me at misterssss@yahoo.com Thanks! Dennis S

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  81. My family lived on the south side of pittsburgh but moved to Detroit in 1945. I found an old light colored fur coat from Joseph Horne Co. with the initials J.E.T. in cursive. my Aunt had it for years and I wonder if you can tell me any info on it.My email is charzblessed@yahoo.com Thanks God Bless

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  82. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Digs Blog has some interesting photos of the Joseph Horne Company in the 1970s. One photo shows the main floor men's department with the columns covered in red velvet for the holiday season.

    Its amazing that stores would put so much into display and decorating. The photos can be found here: http://pgdigs.tumblr.com

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  83. Horne's the greatest department store. Jean

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  84. I am really excited to see all of the wonderful comments about Horne's Department Store. I worked as an Assistant Buyer to the Buyer for the candy, stationary, frames, and gift items while in college. I merchandised the flagship store for these areas as well. I earned the nickname of "the candy girl" because I pushed around a cart full of candies to restock the bulk counters and the shelves around the store. What a fabulous store it was! While I worked there it seemed magical with the beautiful architecture and lovely merchandise.
    I also grew up shopping there with both of my grandmothers. While lots of people shopped at Kaufmanns, it seemed that shopping at Horne's afforded a certain level of status. I really miss it. I echo the sentiments of many if the posters in the comments above, when I say that it really saddens me to see how many beautiful department stores around the country have been closed/demolished. They are a symbol of a better time in history socially.

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  85. We used to go every year on the day after thanksgiving to buy our own, new special tree ornament and then have yes. Remember the annual fall and spring clothing buying. Most precious memory--being chosen to be one of the college board members in the mid-60s. We have lost the sense of ceremony and dignity that were part of those times and so perfectly embodied in stores like this.

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  86. Very well said, and I agree!
    - Bruce

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  87. There was a manager in the mens dept @ the downtown store his name is Nick short fat Italian guy. Does anyone know his last name?

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  88. i bought a yellow wool coat that has the Joseph Horne Co. label on it from an antique store. It is in prime condition. When I had it drycleaned one of the buttongs broke. Now i am looking for 3 antique brown/tannish bowled textured buttons to replace them.

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  89. I am a member of the Ben Avon Area Historical Association. The old Horne Camp is located within the communities we represent. We are looking for any old photos of the camp and would be interested in gathering recollections from people who attended the camp as children. Our historical group can be contacted at: history.benavon.org We would love to hear from you!

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  90. The Tick Tock - a casual luncheonette-- was not at Horne's but was on the mezzanine level at Kaufman's. Great baked ham sandwiches on toast with lettuce, tomato and mayonaise. yum

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  91. This is a fantastic site! Thank you for putting it together. When the downtown store was being sold, I bought one of the 4 huge plaques from the corner of the building at an auction they were having. I have enjoyed it for quite a few years and want to part with it. If there is an interest out there in owning a piece of Pittsburgh history, please contact me. This was on the building through the 1936 flood. Quite a heavy piece! jmrsdr1@yahoo.com

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  92. I am trying to reply to the woman who purchased the yellow wool coat. I am a button collector and may be able to help her. It is not letting me reply. To I have to be a member or something to reply?
    Also I use to work in display at the downtown store and I do have some stories! Don't have time now, but am glad I found this site! LOVE IT! I also have pictures of both Horne's and Kaufman's. Is there any way to post them? Thanks

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  93. Sorry, the commenting problem is endemic to Blogger. Some day, this project may move to a real web site rather than use the blogger format. That is in the future, however. You may send images (scanned at a reasonably high resolution to the email address found on this site: bakgraphics@comcast.net - Thank you,
    -Bruce

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